Fay Jones’ Home- A House of the Ozarks- November 2019

After a short overview of the work of Fay Jones, this presentation will focus upon the documentation and re-presentation of the Fay and Gus Jones House in Fayetteville, of 1956, as prepared by an interdisciplinary team comprised of faculty, staff,…

Fay Jones' Home- A House of the Ozarks- November 2019

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After a short overview of the work of Fay Jones, this presentation will focus upon the documentation and re-presentation of the Fay and Gus Jones House in Fayetteville, of 1956, as prepared by an interdisciplinary team comprised of faculty, staff, and students from the Tesseract Center of Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, and the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design, both components of the University of Arkansas. Highlighted will be the work completed on an exciting public access kiosk, now on display in the Fayetteville Public Library, that invites library patrons to interactively explore the work of Fay Jones generally, and the Fay and Gus Jones House specifically, as well as the work of several other mid-century contemporaries of Jones in Northwest Arkansas, in an effort to highlight the rich architectural heritage of the region. This project, and this presentation, aims to foster a deeper public understanding of the enduring themes expressed in the mid-century modern houses of Fay Jones.

Gregory Herman has been on the faculty of the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design at the University of Arkansas since 1991. Recent teaching and research has included a concentrated focus on the work of Fay Jones; in 2010, Herman’s students garnered the Peterson Prize from the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) for their documentation of the Fay and Gus Jones House in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Since that time, Herman has continued to work with students on the documentation of mid-century modern architects in Fayetteville, Arkansas for HABS. Herman’s ongoing work on Fay Jones has attempted to position his work within the milieu of mid-century modern architecture in the United States generally, and in Arkansas specifically. He has presented several papers on the work of Jones and his contemporaries; his essay, “The Paradigm Shift,” was published in Shadow Patterns (University of Arkansas Press, 2017), a collection of critical essays on the work of Jones. Herman is currently preparing a manuscript focused on the housing of Arkansas resettlement communities built by the Farm Security Administration.

David Fredrick received his Ph.D in Classics from the University of Southern California in 1992. He works at the intersection of higher education and video games, with research interests that include Roman art, architectural history, spatial cognition, and the use of machine learning and neural networks in art history. As director of the Tesseract Center at the University of Arkansas, he manages the production of video games, interactive visualizations, and VR content for teaching and research. In addition to Virtual Pompeii, Tesseract projects include a mobile-based game to teach neuroscience, a game-based module on the Civil Rights movement, a VR application for the Chiesa Nuova/Oratorio dei Filippini complex in Rome, a webGL visualization of Andrea Brock’s research on the Forum Boarium in Rome, a VR prototype for Francis Guy’s Winter Scene in Brooklyn, and a virtual gallery application (Gallery 5) for the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, which received a Golden Muse Award from the American Alliance of Museums in 2015.

Photo credit: University of Arkansas / Russell Cothren

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